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Tuesday, July 28, 2020 | History

3 edition of Indian Ocean in Soviet naval policy. found in the catalog.

Indian Ocean in Soviet naval policy.

Geoffrey Jukes

Indian Ocean in Soviet naval policy.

by Geoffrey Jukes

  • 156 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by International Institute for Strategic Studies in London .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Soviet Union. -- Voenno-Morskoĭ Flot,
  • Soviet Union -- Military policy

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesAdelphi papers -- no. 87
    ContributionsInternational Institute for Strategic Studies.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination30 p.
    Number of Pages30
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL13582672M
    OCLC/WorldCa526017

      The desire for naval supremacy in the Indian Ocean has no longer remained a thrive for military dominance anymore, at least not for the Indian Ocean. The Indian Navy expanding its resources and firepower in the sea zone is targeted to achieve control over the seas, rather than a military doctrine of enemy denial.   These were retained and reinforced by two further task groups that arrived in the Indian Ocean on December 18 and These Soviet naval assets continued to shadow the TF 74 off Sri Lanka until.

    The Soviet Union is primarly concerned about the presence of U.S. nuclear submarines in Ocean and its naval buildup is oriented toward a balance of it.   Maritime Security in the Indian Ocean and Western Pacific by Howard M. Hensel (Editor); Amit Gupta (Editor) Scholars and policy makers have traditionally viewed portions of the Indian Ocean and the Western Pacific as separate and discrete political, economic, and military regions. In recent years, however, a variety of economic, political, and military forces have .

    Ocean in March when several Soviet naval vessels entered the ocean on a tour of ports. Since then, the Soviet naval presence has increased substantially and at an incremental pace. Plausible motives for the Soviet entry into the Indian Ocean include: strategic defense against American ballistic missile submarines (SSBNs). the Pacific, (9 percent) occurred in the Mediterranean Sea, and 34 occurred in the Indian Ocean.2 Of the 1, accidents, have involved naval ships of the United States. This preponderance of U.S. accidents does not mean a higher accident rate than other navies, particularly the Soviet Navy.


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Indian Ocean in Soviet naval policy by Geoffrey Jukes Download PDF EPUB FB2

Indian Ocean in Soviet Naval Policy [Geoffrey Jukes] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Jukes, Geoffrey. Indian Ocean in Soviet naval policy. London, International Institute for Strategic Studies,   In the early s, besides the withdrawal of the Soviet Navy, the Gulf War I and liberalisation of the Indian economy created an opportunity for India to alter its Indian Ocean policy.

It was late in the sixties that Diego Garcia came to be view¬ed as ‘the Malta of the Indian Ocean’ by American naval strategists. Global interests aside, the Arab-Israeli war, which marked a decisive shift of emphasis in US naval strategic priorities, seems to have spurred the USA to renewed activity in the Indian Ocean.

Prior to World War II, the Indian Ocean was an important maritime trade route between European nations and their colonial territories in East Africa, the Arabian Peninsula, British India, Indochina, the East Indies (Indonesia), and Australia for a long time.

Naval presence was dominated by the Royal Navy Eastern Fleet and the Royal Australian Navy as World War II began, with a major Location: Indian Ocean and its surroundings. Table of Contents. Preface -- The Development and Purpose of the Soviet Navy -- The Atlantic Ocean -- Soviet Naval Operations in the North Atlantic, -- The Caribbean Sea, -- West Africa, -- The Mediterranean Sea -- Soviet Mediterranean Fleet Operations, -- Soviet Mediterranean Fleet Operations, -- Role of the Soviet.

In addition to the defensive function of balancing the naval strength in the Indian Ocean against that of the United States Navy, the 8th Squadron played a role in promoting Soviet foreign policy.

Regular visits and port calls were made in the Indian subcontinent, the Persian Gulf, and the East African coast. Indian Ocean. Yet the size and nature of Soviet naval and political activities suggest much more than preparations for an occasional pick up of a space vehicle.

Soviet policies in the Indian Ocean area cannot be separated from Soviet policies elsewhere. The Soviet Union is a world power —a ‘super power’—and by far the largest in the.

A prominent East European visitor said here recently that there are two basic reasons why the Soviet Navy is in the Indian Ocean: (1) there is a Soviet Navy, and (2) there is an Indian Ocean. U.S.-Soviet and U.S.-Russian Dialogue on Nuclear Nonproliferation in South Asia Dr.

Petr Topychkanov November 2, 2 related to the nuclear weapons deployment in the Indian ocean.1 A new round of the Cold War in the end of the 70s didn’t allow them to continue these negotiations.2 The decision by the Soviet Union to send troops into Afghanistan in. Resident Indian Ocean powers have corresponding strategic advantages.

Despite these disadvantages, the Soviets built a large naval presence in the Indian Ocean of up to 22 vessels at its height (a large proportion of them for logistical support).

But the Soviet Navy’s missions were very different from those of the US Navy. Based on formal content analysis of the writings of Admiral Sergei G. Gorshkov and past Soviet ministers of defense and heads of the Politburo, James J. Tritten interprets what the Soviets say they will do in the event of nuclear war.

He then constructs a hardware and exercise analysis of the strategic employment of the Soviet Navy in a nuclear war, offering three possible. US Naval Policy in the Indian Ocean.

Rahul Roy-Chaudhury,Research Fellow,IDSA The recent American missile strikes against targets in Afghanistan and Sudan (August ) were carried out by warships of the US Fifth Fleet operating in the Persian Gulf and the Red Sea.

Naval power, the law of the sea, and the Indian Ocean as a Zone of Peace Barry Buzan The author argues that several questions concerning the rights of warships, which have been largely settled in favour of naval powers at the Third United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS III), have been reopened in the context of the negotiations aimed at.

The dissolution of the Soviet Union in and the subsequent withdrawal of its Navy from the Indian Ocean further helped its cause. In the years that followed, turbulence in Afghanistan, a rise in terrorist activities and the lessons that the US learnt in the war against Iraq forced it to review its strategy for the Indian Ocean, but that was.

Robert G. Weinland, ‘Soviet Naval Operations: 10 Years of Change’, in Michael MccGwire, Ken Booth and John McDonnell (eds), Soviet Naval Policy. The paper discusses recent Soviet initiatives for agreement with the United States on naval arms control, and attempts to evaluate their significance in the context of the Soviet navy's increasingly active role in support of Soviet foreign policy.

The Soviet Union is expanding air and naval activity in the Indian Ocean and adjacent land areas. ΤU‐16 bombers or the Soviet Navy Air Force are flying regular surveillance missions out of Aden. and Robert Herrick’s Soviet Naval Strategy: Fifiy Years of Theory and Practice (Naval Institute Press, ) and Soviet Naval Theory: and Policy (Naval War College, ).

For information concerning the Soviet position, see S. Gorshkov’s The Sea Power of the State (Annapolis: Naval Institute Press, ) or the Russian version, Morskoai mosch’ gosudarstva (Moscow:. This html article is produced from an uncorrected text file through optical character recognition.

Prior to articles all text has been corrected, but from to the present most still remain uncorrected. Artifacts of the scans are misspellings, out-of-context footnotes and sidebars, and other inconsistencies. RECENT CHANGES IN SOVIET NAVAL POLICY: THE PROSPECT FOR ARMS LIMITATIONS IN THE MEDITERRANEAN AND INDIAN OCEAN Anne M.

Kellv Charl es Petersen V'7 I1 CENTER FOR NAVAL.\AN:\ linl Wilson Boulevard Arlington, \ irginia a 22 9 The ideas expressed in this paper are those ul t authors.The main points of the history of the American installation on Diego Garcia, especially its complicated legislative history, and of the Soviet naval presence in the Indian Ocean sinceincluding the base at Berbera, are traced (to early May, ).

More importantly, the Indian Navy had previously operated two ex-Royal Navy carriers including the ship to be named INS Vikrant (ex-HMS Hercules), which saw service in the Indo-Pakistani War of